"You may consider the comparison unfair – an entire newsroom putting out a daily edition as compared to a solo blogger posting one article – but the unfairness is the point. No one shared my article because it was from Stratechery, but then again, no one shares an article today just because it’s from the New York Times; all that matters is the individual article and its worth to the reader and potential sharer."

Ben Thompson’s blog post perfectly sums up the struggle journalism faces today and the untrodden path that lies ahead of us as writers and reporters.

He’s right, we’re all writing, working and creating stories as if we’re freelancers. But what concerns me is how this affects what stories are out there.

Writers need to know how our content (aka “news”) will generate dollars. So at what point are we different from marketers and PR folk (some may argue we never have been)? Many journalism schools are already integrated with marketing and communications programs.

What concerns me is the thought that not every type of news will sell. Thompson points out that if the information (like Crimea or the local school board) is valuable, it’s worth paying for. I agree. But the school board isn’t exactly clickbait. What happens when we stop covering the school board? Don’t the people who can’t pay for information still deserve to have it? 

But then again, I get all my news for free, so what do I know?

"I’ve always been very interested in loving things that required defense."

Hot 97’s Peter Rosenberg talks about his relationship with hip-hop in our new short. (via wnycradiolab)

Dear food girls,

I’m sorry I haven’t written in practically forever but it’s also been crazy busy these days.  The eating adventures haven’t stopped though, we’re just a little behind.

There are quite a few ideas and posts brewing back here, it’s just a matter of making time to dedicate, which will happen! I promise.  We’ve got things like DF at work, spring and summer eats, new recipes we’ve been trying and of…

View On WordPress

(Source: karolinarysava)

beyond—pants:

West Loop rooftops.

beyond—pants:

West Loop rooftops.

fastcompany:

"The perfect Tweet length was right around 100 characters.” - The Proven Ideal Length Of Every Tweet, Facebook Post, And Headline Online

fastcompany:

"The perfect Tweet length was right around 100 characters.”The Proven Ideal Length Of Every Tweet, Facebook Post, And Headline Online

(via npr)

nprradiopictures:

ari-abroad:

This is how old Ukranian men picnic between chess games: brown bread, raw onion, cheese, sausage, radishes, vodka. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1e2Nk5U

NPR’s Ari Shapiro is reporting in Ukraine and is traveling off the beaten path to find great stories, and photos. -Emily

nprradiopictures:

ari-abroad:

This is how old Ukranian men picnic between chess games: brown bread, raw onion, cheese, sausage, radishes, vodka. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1e2Nk5U

NPR’s Ari Shapiro is reporting in Ukraine and is traveling off the beaten path to find great stories, and photos. -Emily

(via npr)

mymodernmet:

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray began documenting the unique storefronts that define New York as a wonderfully diverse place to live. After a decade had passed, the pair went back to the same locations, only to sadly discover that many of the charming family-owned stores had been pushed out and replaced by large chains, banks, and generic businesses. The Murrays documented these rapid changes with side-by-side photographs compiled in a book entitled Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.

(via humanscaled)

newyorker:

The photographer Meike Nixdorf travelled to Tenerife, one of the highest-altitude islands in the world, to capture images of the volcanic terrain at Teide National Park: http://nyr.kr/1mUhjPZ

newyorker:

The photographer Meike Nixdorf travelled to Tenerife, one of the highest-altitude islands in the world, to capture images of the volcanic terrain at Teide National Park: http://nyr.kr/1mUhjPZ

(Source: newyorker.com)