The last traditional wedding

My cousin got married this weekend.

It was a beautiful, mostly traditional Persian wedding. It featured the softreh, an elaborate spread of items that represent wisdom, joy, happiness and everything one could hope for in a marriage. Her bridesmaids held a lovely piece of lace over the couple as they listened to the priestess (traditionally a priest) conduct the ceremony and married women rubbed two cones of sugar over them, ensuring a sweet partnership and life together.

There was the Persian knife dance, an event that brings a bit of levity to the party, where my young, single cousins danced with the knife the couple needed to cut their cake.

Of course, there was delicious Persian food and dancing to Persian pop music. Great party.

And in the midst of the celebration, another cousin of mine said that this will probably be the last traditional wedding in our family.

I denied it to myself quietly at first, but realized she might be right. I was watching our culture slowly fade right before my eyes.

What else could I expect? Not many of us younger cousins were born in Iran. And those who were have lived in the US or other countries most of their lives. Many of us date non-Persians. And really, it’s a beautiful thing. Our future generations will be fantastic combinations of culture and it’s something to be celebrated.

But at the same time, that piece of me, the cultural heritage I so treasure, that’s been wilting away for so long wilted just a little more. I will always be Persian, but a non-traditional one, and that means one less softreh haft-seen to be set at New Year, one less celebration of mehregan, one less shabeh yalda.

Soon these traditions will only be memories. Happy ones, but merely memories, nonetheless. And I feel a great sense of loss in that.

PM Network: 2014 Project of the Year finalists: Innovation in Action

Take a look at my first piece for #PMNetwork on PMI’s Project of the Year 2014 finalists! :

In June, I moved back to Chicago to take a job as an editor at Imagination. I work on editing and producing PM Network, the Project Management Institute’s monthly member magazine. Each year, PMI holds the Project of the Year Awards, where three projects—the cream of the crop—compete for the title and PM Network provides a preview, videos and features on the finalists.

Take a look at my first…

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"One doesn’t know quite what it is that one wants to get off the chest until one’s got it off."

T. S. Eliot (via theparisreview)

I don’t care

I don’t care about eating clean. I don’t care about living that gym life.

Life is too short to skip cake.

latimes:

The downtown L.A. skyline in 1951, 1979 and 2014. Our image specialist Scott Harrison found the unpublished 1979 negative and decided to match it from the same spot: the top of City Hall. He added a photo from 1951 for comparison.

"Also of interest," he writes, “the 1951 photo was shot on 4 x 5 sheet film, the 1979 photo on 35 mm film and the current photo on an iPhone.”

Photos, from top: Ellis R. Bosworth / Associated Press, Bruce Cox / Los Angeles Times, Scott Harrison / Los Angeles Times

wnyc:

Five Things You Had to See Online This Week: form the first animated GIF New Yorker cover to the most ridiculous and comprehensive list of horror movies that will be on TV this October:
http://bit.ly/1rDYPq7

wnyc:

Five Things You Had to See Online This Week: form the first animated GIF New Yorker cover to the most ridiculous and comprehensive list of horror movies that will be on TV this October:

http://bit.ly/1rDYPq7

Happy Mean Girls Day!

Happy Mean Girls Day!

kateoplis:

Frank Gehry's Biomuseo in Panama finally opened its doors today after a decade of construction.

huffposttaste:

Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.

huffposttaste:

Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.

(Source: food-para-dise)

Ross Geller

citationneeded:

Link (thanks, schroduck!)